Posts for: May, 2017

By Smart Family Dental Care
May 17, 2017
Category: Oral Health
BeyonceMakesFlossingaFamilyAffair

As is the case with most celebs today, Beyonce is no stranger to sharing on social media… but she really got our attention with a video she recently posted on instagram. The clip shows the superstar songstress — along with her adorable three-year old daughter Blue Ivy — flossing their teeth! In the background, a vocalist (sounding remarkably like her husband Jay-Z) repeats the phrase “flossin’…flossin’…” as mom and daughter appear to take care of their dental hygiene in time with the beat: https://instagram.com/p/073CF1vw07/?taken-by=beyonce

We’re happy that this clip highlights the importance of helping kids get an early start on good oral hygiene. And, according to authorities like the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry, age 3 is about the right time for kids to begin getting involved in the care of their own teeth.

Of course, parents should start paying attention to their kids’ oral hygiene long before age three. In fact, as soon as baby’s tiny teeth make their first appearance, the teeth and gums can be cleaned with a soft brush or cloth and a smear of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice. Around age 3, kids will develop the ability to spit out toothpaste. That’s when you can increase the amount of toothpaste a little, and start explaining to them how you clean all around the teeth on the top and bottom of the mouth. Depending on your child’s dexterity, age 3 might be a good time to let them have a try at brushing by themselves.

Ready to help your kids take the first steps to a lifetime of good dental checkups? Place a pea-sized dab of fluoride toothpaste on a soft-bristled brush, and gently guide them as they clean in front, in back, on all surfaces of each tooth. At first, it’s a good idea to take turns brushing. That way, you can be sure they’re learning the right techniques and keeping their teeth plaque-free, while making the experience challenging and fun.

Most kids will need parental supervision and help with brushing until around age 6. As they develop better hand-eye coordination and the ability to follow through with the cleaning regimen, they can be left on their own more. But even the best may need some “brushing up” on their tooth-cleaning techniques from time to time.

What about flossing? While it’s an essential part of good oral hygiene, it does take a little more dexterity to do it properly. Flossing the gaps between teeth should be started when the teeth begin growing close to one another. Depending on how a child’s teeth are spaced, perhaps only the back ones will need to be flossed at first. Even after they learn to brush, kids may still need help flossing — but a floss holder (like the one Beyonce is using in the clip) can make the job a lot easier.

If you would like more information about maintaining your children’s oral hygiene, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Top 10 Oral Health Tips For Children” and “How to Help Your Child Develop the Best Habits for Oral Health.”


By Smart Family Dental Care
May 08, 2017
Category: Dental Procedures

Dental bonding offers a simple way to restore and enhance your smile. Your Norcross, GA, dentist, Dr. Orson Baek of Smart Family dental bondingDental Care, explains how bonding works and shares information on several dental issues that can be treated with these cosmetic dentistry treatment.

How does bonding repair teeth?

Soft composite resin is the material used in bonding. Although the composite resin is soft and pliable initially, it becomes very hard when exposed to a curing light. Composite resin comes in the most common tooth shades to ensure that your dental work doesn't stand out when you smile. If you're concerned about costs, you'll want to consider bonding. The procedure is one of the most durable and least expensive dental treatments available. The next time you visit Dr. Baek's Norcross office, ask him if bonding will help your smile.

Will bonding help my smile?

Bonding is often used to repair damaged teeth. It can fill in chipped areas of enamel or even lengthen teeth. Grinding, one of the most common causes of short teeth, may affect your bite and can even make your teeth more susceptible to decay. Bonding builds up your teeth, lengthening and protecting them. Large or deep cracks will need to be treated with crowns, but smaller cracks can benefit from bonding. Applying a thin coating of composite resin is an excellent solution if you want to hide small, noticeable cracks in teeth.

Bonding is equally effective at hiding discolorations as it is concealing cracks. Whether your tooth became darker due to trauma or a dental procedure or changed color after you took tetracycline as a child, dental bonding offers the easiest way to transform your tooth.

Teeth don't always look quite the way we want. Luckily, bonding can be used to address a variety of appearance-related issues. If a tooth is a little bumpy or pitted, a coating of composite resin will help smooth it out. Bonding can also change the shape of a tooth and is often used to make twisted teeth appear straight.

Gaps might not affect your bite, but they can impact the way you feel about your smile. Filling in gaps with composite resin gets rid of small spaces between teeth quickly.

Are you unhappy with the way your smile looks these days? Bonding can help improve your appearance. Call your Norcross, GA, dentist, Dr. Baek of Smart Family Dental Care, at (770) 446-5700 to find out if the cosmetic dentistry option is right for you.


DentalCareisDifficultbutnotImpossibleforaSpecialNeedsChild

A child with a chronic illness or condition often requires a lot of focus on care for their special needs. Other aspects of their health can often take a back seat — too often including dental care.

Proper dental care can be a challenge for special needs children if they have diminished physical, intellectual or behavioral capacities. Children with autism or attention deficit disorders may not be able or willing to perform tasks like brushing and flossing. Other conditions could make them intolerant to toothpaste in the mouth, or create an inability to keep their mouths open or to spit.

Some chronic conditions also seem predisposed to dental defects. For example, enamel hypoplasia, a lack of sufficient tooth enamel, is common with Down, Treacher-Collins or Turner Syndromes, and can greatly increase the risk of tooth decay.

But even though difficult, effective dental care isn't impossible. It begins with your dental provider.

Pediatric dentists are often excellent in this regard: they often have the training and experience to treat children with chronic conditions. Whoever you choose must be able to partner with you in caring for your child's dental needs.

Daily hygiene is also a critical factor. Your goal should be the same as with any child — to teach them to brush and floss for themselves. Depending on their condition, however, you may need to assist them for a longer term, perhaps permanently. But it is imperative — daily hygiene is their best defense against oral diseases.

You should also consider their medication and how it may impact their dental health. Antidepressants, antihistamines or drugs that assist with breathing function can cause mouth dryness. This, as well as drugs with sugar or acid compounds, can increase risk for dental disease. If they must take these types of medications, try to give them at mealtime to reduce their effect in the mouth.

Above all, pursue the same professional dental care as you would for any other child. Keep up regular dental visits beginning around their first birthday for cleanings and preventive measures like topical fluoride or sealants. By taking these measures you'll help ensure their dental health won't suffer.

If you would like more information on dental care for special needs children, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Managing Tooth Decay in Children with Chronic Diseases.”